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African Rebel: A Celebration for a People’s Politician Bernie Grant 1944-2000

African Rebel: A Celebration for a People’s Politician Bernie Grant 1944-2000

Date: June 27, 2019

Time: 19:00 - 22:00

Location: St Ann's Library, Cissbury Road, Tottenham, London, N15 5PU

Events | Screenings

Black History Studies presents the special screening of ‘African Rebel: Celebration for a People’s Politician: Bernie Grant 1944 – 2000’ by Professor Kurt Barling followed by an interactive discussion.

The late Bernie Grant MP led a remarkable life. Over 35 years, he was at the forefront of a furious dialogue about race in British society as a trades unionist and civil rights activist, as the first ever Black Leader of a local authority in Europe in Haringey, North London, as an outspoken Black Member of Parliament, and as an international campaigner.

Bernie Grant MP was one of the first four MPs of colour elected to Parliament in 1987. He was at first a controversial character having been misquoted in the Newspapers during his observations about the Broadwater Farm riots in 1985. Bernie Grant became a stalwart of the Left Wing of the Labour Party with his roots in trade unionism. He became known as a champion of his Tottenham constituency and for often unpopular causes like the The Africa Reparations Movement (ARM UK), set up by Bernie Grant in 1993 with the aim of seeking reparations for the harm done to Africa and the African diaspora through enslavement, colonisation, and racism. During the anti-apartheid years he was a passionate supporter of the ANC and its liberation struggles. Bernie Grant died after a long illness in 2000. One of his closest allies, Jeremy Corbyn, now leads the Labour Party.

In partnership with the Heritage Lottery Fund and The Bishopsgate Institute, the Bernie Grant Trust’s Marginalised No More Project will use the Bernie Grant Archive to enable young Londoners to understand this legacy, and learn from it, as they face racially charged threats to their identity and rights as citizens and consider their options. The archive provides a rich source of material about the social conditions which drove the Black community to enter representative politics as active citizens, the strategies they adopted, and the responses of the wider community to demands for equality and a shared identity. Focusing on the eventful years of 1983-1993 in London, the project explores this critical moment in Britain’s journey to becoming an inclusive society.

Come and lets explore the social and economic conditions and pressures that helped to shape Black British identity at the time, the responses to those pressures, the impact that these actions had not only on the Black British community but also on wider society.

What was it like to be Black and fighting for change in the early 80’s in London?

What was it like living in Tottenham in the early 80’s?

What are the differences between then and now?

How can we be inspired by past successes for marginalised groups in 2019?


THIS EVENT IS NOT TO BE MISSED!!

AN EVENT FOR ALL THE FAMILY!!

This event will take place on THURSDAY 27TH JUNE 2019 from 7pm to 9.30pm. 

Doors open at 6.30pm. Event will start at 7.00pm
 
This event will be held at St Ann’s Library, Cissbury Road, Tottenham, London, N15 5PU. Approx 10 mins walk from Seven Sisters Station. Free on street parking from 6.30pm. Buses 67, 259, 279 stop nearby.

SEATING IS UNRESERVED AVAILABLE ON A FIRST COME FIRST SERVED BASIS.

 Admission will be FREE. Donations would be appreciated. 

PLEASE ARRIVE AT LEAST 15 MINUTES EARLY. 

Places for this event are limited so if you are interested in attending please secure your free ticket.

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